Session IIA: IBD Issues Beyond the Intestine

Dr. Gary Lichtenstein highlights a few of the most common micronutrient deficiencies found in IBD in his presentation titled "The Deficiencies in IBD." He discusses etiology, diagnosis, and management/supplementation of vitamin B12, vitamin D, zinc, and iron deficiencies.

Session IIIC: Innovations and Approaches in IBD Care for Children with IBD

Dr. Lindsey Albenberg discusses the research surrounding diet and IBD in pediatrics in her presentation titled "Diet and IBD: Translating Research into Real-Life Practice." She touches on the role of the microbiome in inflammation, and discusses the evidence supporting EEN and therapeutic diets in IBD. Dr. Albenberg also provides key insight into Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia's partial enteral nutrition protocol.

Session VA: International Perspectives on IBD

Dr. Paulo Kotze explores how nutritional status impacts the decision to perform anastomosis vs create a stoma for IBD patients in his presentation titled "Preventing Surgical Complications in IBD: Lessons from Brazil." He also highlights the role of nutritional status in preventing surgical complications and improving postoperative outcomes, and touches on the role of EEN and PN in optimizing nutrition status.

CME Symposium titled "A Whole New World in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Embracing Novel Horizons With Intravenous Iron"

Dr. Gary Lichtenstein, Dr. Millie Long, and Dr. Stephen Hanauer present on iron deficiency and repletion in IBD. This session discusses the etiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and management of iron deficiency, and includes key information on the role of inflammation in intestinal iron absorption.

Posters

P003: Meat Consumption and All-Cause Mortality in 5,763 Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study. Presented by Jie Chen.

In a prospective study involving 5,763 IBD patients with an average follow up of 11.7 years, more frequent consumption of processed meat was found to be associated with increased risk of mortality in IBD patients. CD patients who ate processed meat >4 times per week had a 2.01 fold increase in all cause mortality compared to CD patients eating processed meats 0.1-0.9 times weekly. Similarly, there was a 1.53 fold increase in mortality in IBD patients in the >4 times per week group vs the 0.1-0.9 times per week group. Unprocessed red meat, poultry, and fish consumption were not shown to increase risk of mortality.

P012: Efficacy of Exclusive Enteral Nutrition and Weekly Adalimumab Combination in Crohn’s Patients with Fibroinflammatory Stenosis. Presented by Salih Tokmak.

In seven patients with newly diagnosed severe disease and fibroinflammatory stenosis, 12 weeks of EEN and concurrent therapy with adalimumab was shown to induce remission. There was significant improvement in CRP, Pro-2 score, Nancy score, and SES-CD score after 12 weeks. The authors concluded there is a need for larger scale, prospective studies exploring EEN in combination with adalimumab.


Nutritional Therapy for IBD

Improving the Care of Patients with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis through Nutrition